Play The Foul Pool Game to Practice Playing Safety

Here’s a new game that will make practicing safe shots a lot of fun. It’s called Foul Pool.

The secret to playing a successful safety shot requires that you focus on the speed and finish of only one ball,the cue ball or the object ball you are hitting.
 
The most common dangers to avoid when executing a safety shot are:
1. Not visualizing the finished safety play (where you want the balls to land).
2. Lingering over your frustration that you can’t pocket the object ball.
3. Failing to get mentally focused that you’re playing a safety shot.
 
Anyone of these slip-ups can leave your opponent with an escape from your poorly played defense.
 

How to Play: Foul Pool

 
1) Rack the balls like you’re going to play a game of 9 Ball.
 
2) Break the balls like you’re going to play a game of 9 Ball. Here is where things change.
 
3) If you make any balls on the break, immediately bring them out and line them up on the spot. If you did not make a ball on the break, it is your opponents turn to shoot.
 
4) Continue to shoot at the One Ball with the intention of playing it as a safety shot. If you make it or make any other ball, spot them up and continue to shoot. You don’t lose your turn.
 
5) The object of this game is to cause your opponent to FOUL when it is their turn to shoot. When they do foul, you get ball in hand and again, playing another safety on the One Ball, attempt to safe them so they again commit a foul by not hitting the One Ball.
 
6) The nine balls always remain in play at all times on the table. The One Ball is the dominant target ball always being pursued to play a safety shot.
 
7) Each time your opponent fouls, they are charged one point. Use whatever means can keep score best. Whoever is first to commit 10 fouls loses the game.
 
55 Defensive Safety Shot Drills will help you to develop greater cue ball control and train you to see a greater number of shots that cause your opponent to foul and end up giving you ball-in-hand more often.
 

3 Comments

Bert Lavoy

11/16/2015 at 02:48:28 PM

I like this and I practice it alone, playing both sides.

However, it seems to me that each player is always trying to play the other safe, even when they themselves are snookered. It stands to reason in my mind, that they if pocket a ball while trying to play safe, this can also be a foul but the ball stays down. Playing safe with less balls becomes more difficult. I suppose you could play it also beginning with 6 or 3 balls.

Paula

02/10/2016 at 03:07:29 PM

It is physically ispmsoible for a ball to continue in the direction it is thrown to be hit by a bat being swung in the opposite direction, to continue in the same general direction and gain velocity. In other words, a foul tip straight back will lose velocity, never gain.However, the question only mentions foul balls. A foul ball, just like a fair ball can be hit in the general opposite direction as the pitch. If the ball is struck solidly by the bat, which has much greater momentum, the ball will leave the bat with an increasing velocity.The typical bat speed in the major leagues is below 90 mph. The mass of the bat and the force it puts on the baseball traveling in the upper 90s, cause the ball to leave the bat with increasing velocity and could reach a peak velocity over 125 mph, depending on many factors. This could be true for a well hit fair or foul ball, particularly a line drive pulled just foul, when the bat is at it's peak velocity.

anon

02/21/2017 at 08:35:43 AM

@Paula

This is about billiards, not baseball.